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Conference Programme

KNOWLEDGE FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT - LUND UNIVERSITY RESEARCH CONFERENCE

8.30 Check-in and mingle with coffee

Room: Lounge

9.00 Opening of the conference

Welcome greetings by Pro Vice-Chancellor Per Mickwitz

Room: Theatre

9.10 Plenary Keynote: What Knowledge for Sustainable Development?

Julia Leventon, Professor in Sustainability Science at the Global Change Research Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences

Room: Theatre

9.40 Coffee break

Room: Lounge & Café

10.00 Thematic parallel sessions with research presentations

Room: Brainstorm

Chair: Susanne Arvidsson, Associate Professor, Deparment of Business and Administration

Research presentations: 

  • Health consequences of climate change in Sweden
    Anna Oudin, Occupational and Environmental Medicine 
     
  • Genuine Savings estimations 1850 - 2018
    Cristián Ducoing, Economic History Department 
     
  • Craft-orientation and post-growth society
    Jens Rennstam, Department of Business Administration

Key words: future-oriented methodologies, mixed methods research, sustainability performance indicators, measuring, analysis, uncertainty, complexity, resilience, substitutability. 

Room: Knowledge

Chair: Heiner Linke, Professor, Department of Physics

Research presentations: 

  • What do blue-green solutions bring to everyday life? Evaluating recreational use, willingness to pay and neighbourhood preferences in Augustenborg, Malmö
    Misagh Mottaghi, Department of Architecture and Built Environment
     
  • Strategic communication for resilience of urban destinations during the COVID-19 pandemic 
    Maria Månsson & Jörgen Eksell, Department of Strategic Communication
     
  • Bridging the science/practice gap – the role of subjective attribution of causes of an event to climate change 
    Kristina Blennow,  Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science
     
  • Methods and Lessons from the History of Youth Environmentalism
    Björn Lundberg & David Larsson Heidenblad, Department of History

Key words: Technologies enabling sustainable development, sustainable solutions, mitigation, collaboration, co-creation, industrial transformation, drivers of change, impact logic, impact synergies, effects, innovation.

Room: Science

Chair: Tanya Andersson Nystedt, Doctoral Student, Agenda 2030 Graduate School

Research presentations: 

  • Security Implications of the EU Circular Economy Initiatives
    Eugène Petelin, Environmental and Energy Systems Studies
     
  • Food Charity to People in Food Poverty - is it a Sustainable Innovation? 
    Elinn Leo Sandberg, School of Social Work
     
  • The value of cash. Economic injustice on a digitalised payment market
    Moa Petersén, Department of Arts and Cultural
     
  • Getting personal with collaborative sustainability experimentation: Reflections and recommendations from a transdisciplinary partnership with the Swedish craft beer sector
    Barry Ness & Darin Wahl, LUCSUS

Key words: Technologies enabling sustainable development, sustainable solutions, mitigation, collaboration, co-creation, industrial transformation, drivers of change, impact logic, impact synergies, effects, innovation.

Room: Theatre

Chair: Henrik Thorén, Researcher, Theoretical Philosophy

Research presentations: 

  • Questioning the Sustainability of Swedish Democracy Promotion in Fragile States
    Darcy Thompson, Human Rights Studies, Department of History
     
  • Livelihoods matter – a comparative political ecology of forest use on Hispaniola
    Nils Droste, Deparment of Political Science
     
  • Assessing the Implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals at Multiple Levels
    Thomas Hickmann & Kristina Jönsson, Department of Political Science
     
  • Towards more Sustainable Meetings and Events
    Peter Arnfalk, Senior Lecturer, IIIEE

Key words: Challenges, implementation problems, contextual understanding, distributional issues, judgment and decision making, system analysis, technology and sustainability trade-offs, policy.

11.00 Break

11.15 Plenary Keynote: The Politics of the Sustainable Development Goals

Kristina Jönsson, Associate professor, Department of Political Science

Room: Theatre

11.45 Matchmaking session

Researchers at Lund University pitch new research ideas and projects, and invites peers to research collaborations.

  • COMPUTE and AI Lund: Connecting the tech, life science and sustainability communities at LU
    Sonja Aits, Associate Senior Lecturer, Department of Experimental Medical Science
  • Utilization of coconut charcoal as a clean cooking fuel, and a way to improve economic empowerment of women in rural Mozambique
    Marcus Lundgren, Associate Professor, Energy Sciences and Ina Johnsson, Master Thesis Student, Environmental Engineering

Room: Theatre

12.00 Lunch Break

Room: Banquet

13.00 Plenary Keynote: IPCC's Mitigation Assessment: Conclusions from AR6 and Future Challenges

Jim Skea, Professor of Sustainable Energy at Imperial College London

Room: Theatre

13.30 Break

13.40 Thematic Parallel session with research presentations

Room: Brainstorm

Chair: Ellen Hillbom, Professor, Department of Economic History

Research presentations: 

  • Exploring Craft in Search of Alternative and Sustainable Forms of Organizing
    Stephan Schaefer, Department of Business Administration 
     
  • Transition Towards Sustainable E-Commerce: A Design Thinking Approach
    Daniel Hellström, Design Sciences, Packaging Logistics

Key words: Future-oriented methodologies, mixed methods research, sustainability performance indicators, measuring, analysis, , uncertainty, complexity, resilience, substitutability. 

Room: Knowledge

Chair: Lars J Nilsson, Professor, Department of Technology and Society

Research presentations: 

  • Artificial intelligence as a tool and target for sustainability efforts
    Sonja Aits, Department of Experimental Medical Science
     
  • Sustainable solutions applied to histopathological analysis of bioengineered materials
    Iran Augusto Neves da Silva, Lung Bioengineering and Regeneration
     
  • Scalable synthesis of zinc phosphide: an earth-abundant photovoltaic absorber
    Simon Escobar Steinvall, Centre for Analysis and Synthesis

Key words: Technologies enabling sustainable development, sustainable solutions, mitigation, collaboration, co-creation, industrial transformation, drivers of change, impact logic, impact synergies, effects, innovation.

Room: Science

Chair: Azher Hameed Qamar, Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Social Work

Research presentations: 

  • The Energy Transition
    Mats Alaküla, Industrial Electrical Engineering and Automation
     
  • Towards artificial photosynthesis with earth-abundant materials
    Linnea Lindh, Chemical Physics & Theoretical Chemistry
     
  • Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology to Reduce Health and Climate Impacts of Ship Emissions
    Joakim Pagels, Department of Design Sciences

Key words: Technologies enabling sustainable development, sustainable solutions, mitigation, collaboration, co-creation, industrial transformation, drivers of change, impact logic, impact synergies, effects, innovation.

Room: Theatre

Chair: Johannes Persson, Professor, Department of Philosophy 

Research presentations: 

  • The facilitators and challenges to obtain sustainable work environment when implementing a digital platform in primary healthcare centres
    Susanne Frennert, Department of Design Sciences
     
  • Visualizing social sustainability in procurement
    Charlotte Magnusson, Department of Design Sciences
     
  • Unsustainable fashion: the co-optation of feminism and sustainability in the fast fashion industry 
    Mariko Takedomi Karlsson, Human Ecology

Key words: Challenges, implementation problems, contextual understanding, distributional issues, judgment and decision making, system analysis, technology and sustainability trade-offs, policy.

14.25 Break

14.40 Creative Session

Researchers at Lund University shares creative examples of methods and tools for co-creation, collaboration, and citizen science, and ways of combining measurements and gathering of data using these methods. We will also address real world problems from stakeholder networks, and help solving them. 

Room: Brainstorm

Three innovative approaches to science communication at an elementary school and upper secondary school level will be illustrated. 

Combining theater and science in a unique way

Scientists work together with theater actors. This creates an experience that stimulates many different parts of the student’s learning. The day starts with a lecture that turns into a theater that aims to illustrate how hard it can be to know how to do the “right” thing. Thereafter, they will carry out three hands-on exercises under the supervision of scientists. Finally, the whole experience is summarized in a discussion/lecture led by the scientist.

The Citizen Science Project: Nano – When less is more!

The citizen science project seeks to map the occurrence of nanomaterial containing consumer products in the homes of Swedish school kids, while increasing awareness of nanomaterials, the opportunities which they represent and their potential environmental effects. The project encompasses different teaching materials which can be directly applied in-class. The teachers are equipped with in-depth notes, explaining the terms and theories needed for them to be on top of the addressed topics. Reported data is quality controlled and feeds into an online European inventory. To document changes in the students’ perception of nanoparticles over the course of the project a pre- and post-survey is introduced. This gives important insight into societal effects and public awareness.  

The online inventory of European nano-products hosted by the Technical University of Denmark - nanodb.dk

The interactive lecture 

The interactive lecture is based on collaboration between actors, scientists and artists. It aims at increasing the awareness of plastic nanoparticles in society by involving the audience directly in the lecture. Participating students make choices as the lecture arrives at several crossroads, where the audience must pick a way forth – some which are easy to make and some which are tough decisions. Through their active participation, they will realize that many issues related to nanoparticles are yet to be explored and are full of uncertainty. As part of the concept, the students will fail to make the “right” decisions illustrating the wickedness of the dilemmas, which today’s decision makers face. The project encompasses live theater, short videos, and on-stage experiments. Further, the project includes an art workshop, where the students are asked to paint or draw the unseen.  

Organising researchers from NanoSafety 

  • Lauge P.W. Clausen, Postdoctoral Fellow, Technical University of Denmark
  • Martin Lundqvist, Researcher, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University
  • Mikael Ekvall, Researcher, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University
  • Tommy Cedervall, Researcher, Biochemistry and Structural Biology, Lund University

Nanosafety - nano.lu.se 

Room: Science

Two examples on how to enable scientific discovery through the application of advanced visualisation and dataanalysis techniques will be shown. InfraVis@LU will be available for information and networking. 

Virtual Reality and Social Sustainability

Virtual Reality (VR) has shown big potential as health intervention in elderly care. For example, immersion in interactive virtual nature environments can decrease stress, anxiety, and boredom. In this demo you will be able to try some VR applications that have been developed for this purpose. 


Sustainability and Agriculture - CO2 binding and food production

Food production is critical for humanity. Can we maintain harvest quota in a way that is climate friendly? Even, possibly, by binding CO2 from the atmosphere instead of realising it? Data visualisation and machine learning can help us discover the way forward towards a more environmental and sustainable future. We estimate and optimise future harvest production by combining data and local information (e.g. topology, soil samples, irrigation information as well as satellite data).  

InfraVis@LU

InfraVis is the new national Swedish infrastructure for the visualisation of data. Through InfraVis users will have access to state of the art equipment, methods, and experts enabling user to obtain information and knowledge previously hidden within their data.

Organising researchers from InfraVis@LU

  • Mattias Wallergård, Senior lecturer, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology, Lund University
  • Maria Hedin, Research Assistant, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology, Lund University
  • Alexandros Sopasakis, Senior lecturer, Mathematics, Lund University
  • Anders Sjöström, Expert, Project manager, LUNARC, Centre for Scientific and Technical Computing at Lund University
  • Katja Woxell, Communications Officer for Research Infrastructures, HALOS, InfraVis, Lund University

Room: Knowledge

UNOPS innovation programme works with high impact startups that address the sustainable development goals (SDGs). These startups come from all around the world, and the programme works with them to overcome challenges they face to make a real world impact. 

The team at EQUO see the real negative impact of plastics within their community. EQUO is a sustainable brand from Vietnam providing 100% plastic-free solutions to solve the single-use plastic problem. Starting with drinking straws and utensils made of natural materials like grass, rice, sugarcane, coconut and coffee.

EQUO as a start-up faces some challenges and we want to use the bright minds of Lund University researchers and students to help us solve them! Can you add to an ideation around the challenges of:

  • How to better educate customers (consumers & businesses) to differentiate compostable vs biodegradable?
  • What new materials can be used to explore and develop “plastic-free” bags?
  • How can they overcome concerns customers have with new coconut materials?

Come join this interactive session, to hear about EQUO, share your experiences and make new connections. 

The total number of participants for this workshop is 20 people (first in first served). 

Background

The single-use bags in different shapes & film formats are widely used across many industries in daily life: F&B, e-commerce, fashion, agriculture. The new product line (compostable bag) would play a key role in our revenue stream and brand awareness besides the original ones while contributing to reducing plastic pollution.  

However, deciding the right alternative materials to replace single-use plastic bags is a real challenge from research, procurement to customer education/acquisition because not all businesses and consumers can differentiate compostable standards. 

Even those with international standards such as ASTM D6400 or EN 13432, the industrial composting environment is not clearly communicated by the manufacturers and traders.  The consumers can hardly know/differentiate the home & industrial environment. This term is mis-used, jeopardised by low-quality factories/suppliers around the world.

Organisers from UNOPS

  • Rebecca Alice Pryce, UNOPS
  • Jonas Michanek, UNOPS

UNOPS - unops.org

15.10 Coffee Break

Room: Lounge & Café

15.30 Plenary - Presentations and panel discussion

Room: Theatre

Moderator: Per Mickwitz, Pro Vice-Chancellor

Lund University interdisciplinary projects focusing on Agenda 2030 and sustainable development are invited to present and discuss their projects. Panel members: 

Project: Postgrowth Welfare Systems

  • Max Koch, School of Social Work
  • Riya Raphael, Department of Gender Studies

Project: Nature-based solutions at the climate-biodiversity-health nexus

  • Peter Nilsson, Internal Medicine - Epidemiology
  • Marlis Wullenkord, Environmental Psychology

Ten postdocs kick off excellence programme for sustainable development - lunduniversity.lu.se

Register to the conference

Registration closed. 

Time for the event

2 May 2022 08:30 to 16:30

Location

Scandic Star Hotel, Lund

Target group

The conference is aimed at researchers associated with Lund University, as well as other researchers, stakeholders, and students who wish to join the discussions and share their views and learn more about research conducted at Lund University.

Language

English

Contact

cerina [dot] wittbom [at] cec [dot] lu [dot] se

Posters

The poster contributions will be available throughout the conference in Lounge & Café. Take the opportunity to ask questions during the breaks or the creative session. 

  • Graceful degradation to prolong lifetime of semiconductors
    Erik Larsson, Integrated Electronic Systems
  • Potential air-quality improvements of future energy carriers in transportation
    Vilhelm Malmborg, Ergonomics & Aerosol Technology
  • Motivated Empathy and Affective Decisions
    Alexander Tagesson, Cognitive Science

Information desks

Different support functions within the University will be available at the standing tables to inform, answer questions and help out. Approach them during the coffee breaks. 

  • Funding opportunities from Horizon Europe
    Anna-Karin Wihlborg, Research Services
  • Innovation and the LU Sustainability Fund
    Cecilia Jädert & Emma Nordell, LU Innovation
  • LUCRIS
    Hanna Voog, Department of Scholarly Communication